Burma

travel

Bagan: Sunrise or Sunset?

While I was in Myanmar for two weeks, I heard Bagan was the crown jewel of the country – with over 2,000 Buddhist temples still standing today from an impressive original 10,000. The landscape, a mix of lush green trees and dirt roads over a flat horizon, boasts a plentiful amount of these ancient brick temples as far as the eye can see. Sometimes a mist shrouds the surface, or clouds create impressive contrasts with the sunlight. Nonetheless, I decided to check out the hype of these frequently Instagrammed shots of a sunrise in this mystic ancient city with hot air balloons all around.

As we went in April 2018, one important thing to note was we could not officially climb up temples to claim the BEST spot for sunrise/sunset, high enough to see the other temples but not too high from the ground. Myanmar decided to ban climbing on temples (again). Officially. But we asked locals who agreed to take us to the few temples that people could still climb and weren’t guarded. So we did this for a sunrise at Ta Wet Hpaya, which as of April 2018 was open for secret sunrise viewing.

Good news, it was indeed a beautiful spot to watch the sunrise. Bad news, we weren’t the only ones who learned about this ‘secret’ temple, so there were quite a few of us up there catching the most distinct part of Bagan sunrises: the hot air balloons!

While we didn’t have the clearest day to watch a super sunrise, we ‘got the gist’ of it. We arrived around 5:45 am while it was still dark out, climbed up the stairs to the roof of the temple, waited for the balloons to float out and for the sun to rise. The balloons came out very slowly out of a corner in the horizon around 6:45 am or so. I’ll say this, on a clearer day, I bet it would have been much more beautiful, and the colors would have swirled against that cotton candy pink and blue backdrop into a scorching ball of yellow fire on the horizon. It was a nice experience, but we decided that would be our only sunrise in Bagan, as the weather and cloud cover was supposed to be about the same for the other days. Bottom line: WORTH IT, IF you find a temple to safely climb and you have luck with a clear day. It’s a memorable experience, and I hope Myanmar revisits their ‘no temple climbing’ policy soon!

Sunset is a different story. Since the temples are officially closed for climbing, the Burmese authorities have attempted to narrow the spots to watch the sunset to two manmade hills where they actually check if you’ve paid the 25,000 Kyat pass to access all the temples. Guess what? We actually didn’t know this, and no one told us about this ticket in advance, so we never bought one. In the end, we got to catch a sunset on one of the hills for zero Kyat, as we convinced them that we left our ticket at home. Oops and yay!

Here, it was way more crowded than sunrise, because like I mentioned it’s a hot spot and one of the few ways to officially watch the sunset, plus it has a controlled entrance. So to get a nice spot in peace without people on the way is harder. Yet again, we did not have the clearest day for a sunset, so we took our pics and enjoyed the weather cooling down after a very hot day. Bottom line: WORTH IT to see sunset from the hill. Just buy your temple passes in advanced.

Lastly, or should I say firstly, we checked out the Nan Myint tower on our first sunset tour, which logically seemed like the highest, ergo best place to see the sunset. Alas, no, it was not and for multiple reasons. Firstly, it is too high up – and remember when I mentioned you don’t need a bird’s eye view, just to be slightly higher than one or two stories up? From the tower, the horizon doesn’t look as impressive. Then, reason 2, it is quite far from the densely populated temple area, which is the gem you want to capture in photos. And lastly, it’s not free. You have to pay an entrance of about US$5, and if you’re thirsty or hungry, the restaurant (with a lovely view) is available for a pretty penny. As such, the bottom line for this: NOT WORTH IT, but if you have an excellent camera lens, you may get some nice zoomed shots.

I think ultimately that sunrises are the most impressive in Bagan, although they depend on whether you can find a temple to climb with fewer people and cooperative weather.

What do you prefer: sunrise or sunset?