backpacking

travel

How I quit my job and backpacked the world

IMG_7975Backpacking ready

So, let me begin by saying that there’s not really a magical recipe for quitting your job and traveling for a while. Many will fantasize and ponder of doing so, but few will take action. It’s not for everyone (or, not everyone can afford to do so, due to family obligations, money constraints, or they aren’t ready to part with their job for so long). I will say that circumstances tend to gravitate toward one outcome, even one that may surprise you. Traveling is a great excuse to do what you want and take control of your experiences. Up until a certain point, I as always told what to do, what to study, what career to pursue, what security to aim for, what kind of guys to date even! As much as I appreciate sound advice, there comes a time when you just scream STOP! to all the outside noise and try to make a decision for yourself based on your own rationalizations.

When life presents you with a junction, you pick a road to take. Not to get all Robert Frost on you, but I took what I believed was the road less traveled by (ironically, the traveling road) when I decided to travel for a while. I hung up my 8-year corporate badge and the career identity I was convinced defined me for so long, and within one week, I was on a one-way flight to Peru with no further plans or ideas of what to do with myself. I didn’t think about money or what to do after I might finish. I had hastily packed my shit into a new Osprey backpack, thinking “So this makes me a backpacker, right?” No, it turns out a backpacker is more of a mentality than a physical pack. All I knew was that I wanted to see Machu Picchu, and the rest would fall into place.

As for traveling alone, nothing felt more natural. Look, I’m an extrovert, in a committed relationship (long distance at the time), love being social and making friends, but traveling alone is a really cool experience. You’re alone but not lonely. It warms my heart to see so many women of all ages choosing to travel on their own, even if just one trip – we’re not only taking power into our own hands, but we are breaking this stupid societal norm that a woman traveling alone is odd, lonely or dangerous.

For those who think that traveling always requires planning in advance, I challenge you that it’s not always the case. With internet at our fingertips, the planning can happen within minutes, instead of months. Granted, some things I did miss because tickets were sold out in advance of when I was going, or airfare at the last minute wasn’t the most affordable. I never really let that discourage me though. If something is sold out in advance, that’s usually an indicator that it is very touristy and crowded. The chance to breathe a new country’s air and witness their landscape is good enough for me; there’s plenty of off-the-beaten-path place you can discover, you just have to ask the locals.

“But income,” you might say, or “career growth!” “How can you leave a secure job for a life of aimless wandering?” “What will people think?” “What will you do with your life after?”

Let me share with you a post I found sobering – the top 5 regrets of the dying:

Source: https://goo.gl/images/81mKQr

Yes, this is pretty sad stuff, but it’s also a good reminder to focus on the now and to stay true to yourself. If your passion is traveling, why not do it? We often set our own obstacles and convince ourselves we can’t surmount them, therefore something like traveling is just not feasible or appropriate right now. You may hate your job, but quitting it to travel sounds too risky – what if you get offered a great position in two years? Or you’ve got a family or partner that can’t join you or doesn’t support you going somewhere alone. Regardless of the reason, if you do decide to go on a journey, don’t look back or second-guess yourself.

Look, I left unsure of what to make of my life up until that point. I just knew what I was doing every day, waking up at 4:45 am to get ready and be at work by 7:00 am to perform a job I could care less about and impress people who viewed me as expendable. I knew I loved traveling and I hated limited myself to going somewhere two times a year. So I left. Just like that.

I came back after 4 months from a world tour of 13 countries, hauling a heavier Osprey on my back and a fuller heart. Above all, I realized the insignificance of what we trivialize in daily life (such as working too hard, pleasing others, comparing ourselves to impossible equals, etc.). I may not have figured out what I wanted to do next, but I was more certain than ever it wasn’t what I had been doing before. And maybe that clarity of mind of what you don’t want is an important step to figuring out what you do what.

And so, consider where you are in life and think if traveling is what you really want to do. You’ll find that justifying or rationalizing your thinking is a learned skill, and as humans, we are innately irrational – so don’t be afraid of letting your instincts drive your decisions to travel. You’ll be glad you did!